Immigration Lawyer / Immigration Attorney

Phone

(206) 488-9030

Adjustment of Status

If you are currently in the United States and meet certain eligibility requirements, you may become a Lawful Permanent Resident (LPR). This process is called Adjustment of Status. After you apply, even before you become an LPR, you may obtain an Employment Authorization Document and may be eligible to travel overseas.

There are many advantages to becoming an LPR. As a green card holder, you are permitted to work indefinitely and you can bring family members to the United States. Your green card can be taken away if you do certain things, for example, live outside of the US for too long or commit a crime.

However, for most green card holders, you may begin the Naturalization process after five years if you have successfully maintained your LPR status.

Provisional Waiver

The I-601A Provisional Waiver allows certain immediate relatives of U.S. citizens to apply for a provisional waiver of the unlawful presence ground of inadmissibility while still in the United States if they can demonstrate that being separated from their U.S. citizen spouse or parent would cause that U.S. citizen relative “extreme hardship”.

Fiance Visa

The K-1 Fiancé Visa permits a person to enter the United States to marry a US Citizen. If you are already married, you may not use this visa. You must marry your US Citizen fiancé within 90 days of your arrival in the US. As long as you marry within that time, you may remain in the United States while you file a separate application to become a Lawful Permanent Resident (green card holder).

 Spousal Visa

A U.S. Citizen may apply for his or her spouse to come to the United States as a Lawful Permanent Resident (LPR).

You are eligible to apply for your spouse become a Lawful Permanent to the United States if: you are a U.S. Citizen; you are legally married to your foreign spouse; you are free to marry; and you are able to support your foreign spouse financially.

Citizenship and Naturalization

If you are a lawful permanent resident and meet certain requirements, you may petition for US Citizenship. This process is called Naturalization. If you become a US Citizen you have many more rights including, for example, the ability to live outside of the United States without losing the right to return, the right to petition for family members to come to the United States, the right to vote, and finally, if you are charged with a crime or any other improper activity after becoming a US Citizen, you will not face deportation or removal.